My teaching builds from my conviction that learning takes place when learners are motivated to form questions, to seek answers, and to establish ownership and authority over the knowledge they acquire. This process mirrors the discipline of history and serves to cultivate a community of scholars. In this learning environment, I am the chief learner and more knowledgeable guide. My goal is to be a model of enthusiasm and intellectual curiosity, establishing high standards for achievement but also helping students build the skills necessary to succeed. I want students to leave my courses with a strong foundation of historical knowledge as well as sharpened skills in critical thinking, collaborative problem solving, and written and oral communication. I hope they will see their history course not as an end to itself, but as a springboard to life-long learning.


During Spring 2022, I will be teaching “Cities and Suburbs” for undergraduate students. This is a course about why we live where we live, and the historical developments that have led us to these choices and circumstances. We will begin by digging into some of the hidden history of our campus environment, then follow our questions and interests to investigate the wider history of cities and suburbs in the United States (including our own South Jersey/ Philadelphia region). In addition to History, the course counts toward requirements for Digital Studies. Students will gain training and practical skills in digital research and data visualization, but no prior experience with digital tools is required.

I also offer two individualized, experiential learning opportunities each semester: “Public History Practice” for undergraduates, and “History Practicum” for graduate students.


 

Samples of current and recent syllabi are available upon request.

Past Courses

Undergraduate

By Arrangement: Public History Practice

World’s Fairs and Empire (Spring 2015)

Cities and Suburbs in American History (Spring 2014 – please note this course will be revised for 2022)

Perspectives on History (Fall 2013)

Perspectives on History (Fall 2012) – Developed with support from the Rutgers-Camden Civic Engagement Faculty Fellows initiative.

Urban and Suburban America (Fall 2011)


Graduate

Issues in Public History (Revised with support from the Rutgers-Camden Digital Teaching Fellows initiative).

Issues in Public History (Fall 2013)

Historic Interpretation (Spring 2013)

Issues in Public History (Fall 2012)

Urban History Colloquium (Fall 2011)

Introduction to Public History (Spring 2011)

Material Culture in America (Fall 2010)


Graduate Independent Study

Topics in Historic Preservation
Material Culture and Historic House Curatorship
History and Memory of the American Revolution

Additional courses offered previously:

  • U.S. Gilded Age and Progressive Era (undergraduate and graduate)
  • The 1890s (undergraduate)
  • History of Philadelphia (undergraduate)
  • Urban Research Seminar (graduate)
  • Artifacts in History (undergraduate)
  • History and Memory (undergraduate honors)
  • U.S. History to 1877 (undergraduate)
  • U.S. History since 1877 (undergraduate)
  • Themes in Modern World History (undergraduate)